Vampire Literature

A vampire is an evil creature from European folklore which subsists solely by feeding on human blood. In popular European folklore, vampires were undead beings who would visit family members and often caused murders and mayhem in the streets they lived in while they still lived. Although vampires have no physical form today, their history can be traced back to some of the greatest Gothic literature of all time, including the famous stories of Dracula and Bram Stoker. Even before these famous legends began to circulate around the world, vampires had been a staple of European mythology.

The earliest vampire myth came from Germany in the 16th century. This story claims that a vampire would only feed on blood and as a result was banished from heaven. Although this legend could not be proved, many people believe it was true. Some believe that the story was created to create controversy between Christians and pagans.

In Victorian England, the Victorian Gothic subgenre of literature included stories of vampires. Vampire literature was a popular genre during the middle ages, and often contained a touch of truth, although often not in the way that it was intended. Many popular vampires from this period included the famous Dr. Frankenstein, Count Dracula, Count Lestat, and the most famous of them all: Vincent Van Gogh.

During the later years of American history, vampire fiction became a big hit. Popular vampires included such characters as Vampires, Dr. Gregory House, Dr. Evelyn Smythe, and Count Dracula. These vampires portrayed an alternative version of history and represented the darkest side of American culture at this time.

Modern vampire literature is also very popular. Famous writers include Stephenie Meyer, Anne Rice, E.L. James, and Neil Gaiman.

American vampires have also been portrayed in movies. The most famous vampire from this genre was Michael Jackson. Although some say he was a real vampire, many others believe he was just part of a “twisted” fairy tale. Jackson made his career out of acting like a fake vampire.

American Vampire literature continues to influence contemporary society, and even has a great deal of success on Broadway. Some of the best known of these are the Twilight novels by the great British writer, Stephenie Meyer.

As with all folklore, myths and legends are often misunderstood and may actually be far different than what is depicted in popular culture. In the case of vampires, there are many legends about their lives that are untrue, or simply fictionalized versions of what really happened in their real life.

For example, in popular culture, the legendary “Buffy” from Buffy the Vampire Slayer is considering a modern day “Romeo”. However, according to popular belief, in the original series, the character is a lesbian and was actually a were-witch instead of a lesbian vampire.